Shepherd’s Pie

Ingredients: 1 pound rolled sausage 1 med. onion, chopped (about 1⁄2 cup) 1 can (10 3⁄4 oz) Campbell’s Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup (Regular or 98% Fat Free) 1 tablespoon ketchup 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas and carrots 1 cup of milk 2 tablespoons butter 1 1/3 cups real mashed potatoes, (Our Gypsy’s Cart Potato Ricer works really well for the mashed potatoes – the best part is that you won’t have to peel any potatoes!) Directions: Start boiling the potatoes (unpeeled). Heat the oven to 400 degrees F. Cook the sausage and onion in a 10 inch skillet over medium-high heat until the sausage is well browned, stirring to separate the sausage. Pour off any fat. Stir the soup, ketchup, black pepper, peas and carrots in the skillet. Spoon the sausage mixture into a 9-inch pie plate. (I add additional milk to this mixture if it is too thick) For the mashed potatoes, remove the potatoes from the stove, cut them into smaller pieces, put them in your ricer (unpeeled) and add butter to the strained potatoes.  It’s that simple! Spoon the potatoes over the sausage mixture and blot with butter. Bake for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are lightly browned. Serves: 4-6...

Choosing the Perfect Potato

  Do you know the perfect variety of potato to use for making mashed potatoes? What about the right one for baked? Does it make a difference which type of potato you use when preparing a specific recipe or are all potatoes created equally?   You may be surprised to find out that it really DOES make a difference in what type of potato you choose when you cook. Using the right potato for the recipe can result in a dish that is comforting and delicious. The wrong type of potato, however, may result in a dish that is edible but definitely not as good as you know it can be or it could turn out all wrong and not enjoyable at all.   Which type of potato do you use when choosing different methods of cooking? Here are some hints to help you choose the perfect potato for the dish you are preparing:   Mashed potatoes have been a comfort food for hundreds of years. Choosing the right potato will result in smooth, creamy potatoes with just the right amount of lumps. For mashed potatoes, the best type of potato to choose is one that is waxy. Yukon gold, white rose and red rose potatoes are your best bet when making mashed potatoes because they aren’t as starchy as other potatoes. Stay away from russet or Idaho potatoes as they are too starchy and result in mashed potatoes that are mealy rather than smooth.  Please – if you are mashing potatoes, don’t waste hours of your life, peeling potatoes and hurting your elbow, just go buy a potato ricer,...